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Mark Bello

House Passes the Protecting Access To Care Act, but It’s Not Too Late To Be Heard

Yesterday, I penned “Act Today to Stop H.R. 1215 from Destroying Your Rights.” Hours later, the House passed H.R. 1215 by a vote of 218 to 210. The bill now heads to the Senate for review. Putting citizens at such […]

Mark Bello

Act Today to Stop H.R. 1215 from Destroying Your Rights

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives will be voting on the “Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017” or H.R. 1215. I, as well as others here, have written about H.R.1215 in the past, but for those readers that may […]

Wayne Parsons

What rights will H. R. 1215 eliminate?

If I read public sentiment correctly, people are tired of big government imposing rules and limitations on their rights. Does Washington DC get the message? H. R. 1215 does just the opposite. Here are a few examples: If a defect in […]

John Bair

Standing Up to H.R. 1215

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives will vote on a massive tort reform bill that has the potential to strictly limit many plaintiffs who file a health care lawsuit. For patients who have been injured by medical negligence and file a […]

Tatum O’Brien

H.R. 1215- an Anti-Justice Bill Limiting Recovery for those Injured in Healthcare Cases.

Congress has recently taken several bills under consideration related to tort reform. If these bills are passed, they could limit, eliminate, or significantly change individual’s access to the justice. On June 28, 2017, the House is to vote on “Protecting […]

Mike Bryant

Constitution? States Rights? Right to Contract? Crazy Ideas H.R. 1215

Those odd Republicans in Washington are at it again, contradicting their core values. This new Medical Malpractice bill (HR 1215) pretends to “reduce healthcare costs” by 1) capping damages in medical malpractice cases, 2) capping attorney fees, and 3) doing […]

T. Thomas Metier

Who Bears the Burden of Proving an Underlying Judgment Would be Collectible in a Legal Malpractice Case?

The appeals court ruled in favor of the plaintiff, holding that the burden was actually on the attorney-defendant, not the plaintiff, to prove the judgment would have been uncollectible as an affirmative defense.

Rick Shapiro

Federal Efforts to Cap Medical Malpractice Awards Stall

A rare win appears within reach for the “forgotten people” who stand to lose so much if Republicans in Congress succeed in completely repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). H.R. 1215, introduced as companion legislation to the American […]

Mark Bello

Texas Continues to Attract Doctors that are “Bad to the Bone”

A Texas doctor was recently sentenced to life in prison for over 30 botched spinal surgeries that left patients seriously injured, paralyzed, or dead. Although the 44-year-old doctor is the first surgeon known to be imprisoned for a botched surgery, […]

Chris Nace

Remembering Jerry Canterbury: The Man Who Led the Charge for Patients to Control Their Own Medical Destiny.

Over the weekend we learned, more than two months after the fact, that Jerry Canterbury had passed away on March 15th in Hartville, Ohio at the age of 78. Considering the delay in news of his death, it might not […]